Globulous, marmalade, slabs of splendour

unnamed-1

The curly one and I took a little trot around Camden Passage in Islington on Saturday and what a very lovely experience it was. Set back from Upper Street, but a stone’s throw from Angel tube, lies this eclectic bubble of shops selling both nicks and nacks for home and person.
It is famous for its many antique shops, specialising in, amongst other things, Asian ceramics, antique drinking glasses, silverware, old boxes and African waistcoats, as well as housing some contemporary home ware shops and a smattering of market stalls, cafes, restaurants and hairdressers.
Curly and I spent ages pouring over the treasures of a stall selling brass engraved stamps and settled on a penguin, a plaice and an anchor. My ideas is that we can personalise our stationary, and possibly even use these as our new family wax seals. Thus we could be certain that our next dinosaur party invite is not opened by any but the intended recipient.
As part of our recognisance of Camden Passage we happened upon Odyssey20C. I have often passed this shop and been drawn to its beautiful window displays, but today we went in.
The owner, Paul, is a master of composition and the illumination of his vividly-hued glassware is beautiful. The only problem is that the collective display is so spellbinding you end up wanting to buy all four shelves of merchandise, rather than just one item.
In particular these globulous, marmalade, slabs of splendour caught my eye. They are in fact tangerine coloured Whitefriars Architectural slabs from the late 60’s.

20150214_153136
Whitefriars glassworks started in 1680 in London on a site that was originally a monastery of the Carmelite Fathers, hence the name White Friars. In the nineteenth century the firm, also known as James Powell and Sons, became leading glassmakers, leadlighters and stained glass window manufacturers.
These architectural slabs were originally designed for use as panes or glass bricks in windows. They were created in four square and three rectangular glass shapes with different indentations. I love these tangerine slabs. The colour is compelling and they are very tactile. If you want to create a unique kitchen splash back or a stained glass window, herein lies the answer.

unnamed

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Interior design

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s